Author: nlyons

Moore and Scorsese’s Psychotic Anti-Heroes

There are countless parallels between Alan Moore’s Watchmen and Martin Scorsese’s film Taxi Driver (1976), but I find the strongest to be between the narrations of Rorschach’s journal and Travis Bickle’s voiceover. Both Rorschach and Bickle live in New York City and explicitly comment how disgusted they are by the city and its people. Based..

Read more

Miró in Motion

The Joan Miró version of the classic Little Red Riding Hood story is extremely abstract in its imagery. Comparatively, the visuals of this particular version are highly stripped down, but it still contains the bare-bones elements of a comic, perhaps even more so than the other versions in some areas. I find that this was..

Read more

Gordo’s Great Visual Variations

I found it extremely interesting that, based off of what we studied in class, Gus Arriola’s Gordo was widely different across issues, something we haven’t quite seen yet. There is a set of recurring characters, but the focus seems to shift across whose story is being told, and further some issues did not feature these..

Read more

Which One Is Wonder Woman?

We have discussed many of the issues with the character of Wonder Woman, in addition to her relationship to men, but we haven’t talked much about her relationship to women within the comic. Something that struck me while reading is for the most part, the women of the comic look exactly the same. They look..

Read more

Keeping Tintin on the Top Shelf

In class, we took time to discuss the implicit racism within The Adventures of Tintin and addressed the question of whether or not we would share these comics with children. Though these comics are iconic and enjoyable to read, I do not think they should be shared with children. Some students said, while growing up..

Read more

Tintin, Keaton, Chaplin

The Adventures of Tintin is heavily influenced by film in several ways, in both its content and execution. While reading, I was immediately reminded of the works of iconic filmmaker-actors Buster Keaton and Charlie Chaplin which, interestingly enough, were an inspiration to Herge. Tintin is built on a foundation of Western film traditions and techniques…

Read more

Breaking the Fourth Wall

Before his cartoons hit the silver screen in films like Dream of a Rarebit Fiend (1906), cartoonist Windsor McCay practiced cinematic techniques on paper in his comics. One example can be seen in the “Little Sammy Sneeze” comic that we analyzed in class. The borders of the panels are strong and dark, forming a windowpane..

Read more